This is How I Feel About That
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(Source: leoblah)

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reagan-was-a-horrible-president:

justinspoliticalcorner:

h/t: Matt-Lee Ashley at Climate Progress

The Republican Party never runs out of awful ideas do they?!? Please stop voting Republican. They are terrible people.

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We can remake our policies so that they’re smart. Studies have shown that prison does not deter crime. In a lot of cases, it creates many more problems than it solves. Locking up huge swathes of our population makes communities less safe by because huge numbers of people are torn away from their families and from the ability to hold down a job, because we’re warehousing people in overcrowded jails and prisons, and because having a record can cut away at someone’s ability to vote or seek employment after they get out. We must do better. We spend $80 billion dollars a year incarcerating people, which is 400% more than we spent twenty years ago. Some of the money could be better spent on raising healthy kids, not feeding a morally corrupt network that connects our children in their classrooms to the prison industrial complex.
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We don’t flog people in our prison system, or put them in thumbscrews or stretch them on the rack. We do, however, lock prisoners away in social isolation for 23 hours a day, often for months, years or decades at a time. We prohibit the former and permit the latter because we make a distinction between physical and social pain. But, at the level of the brain where pain really resides, this is a distinction without a difference.
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Living in America at a time when the terms of virtually every political debate are set by the right-wing noise machine is like living in a science fiction dystopia in which malign forces try to enslave the population by deliberately causing mass brain damage. If evil alien overlords were attempting to infest all of our minds with toxins that made us all significantly stupider, and thus made us increasingly fearful of things that couldn’t possibly harm us, it would be exactly like living with widespread conservative propaganda.
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liberalsarecool:


Via Teabonics

liberalsarecool:

Via Teabonics

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They introduce themselves as pro-life. And I say, ‘Oh, I’m so glad. You must be fighting for healthcare for the poor.’ And they look at me like I’m bonkers.
Sheila Walsh, a Catholic nun (via stfuprolifers)
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Debt is the most effective way to take a relation of violent subordination and make the victims feel that it’s their fault. Colonial regimes did this all the time; they would charge people for the cost of their own conquest, via taxes. However, using debt in this way also has a notorious tendency to rebound, because the subtle thing about debt relations is that, on a certain level, they are premised on equality—we are both equal parties to a contract. This both makes the sting of inequality worse, because it implies you should be equal to your creditor but you somehow messed up, but also, makes it possible to start saying ‘wait a minute, who owes what to who here?’ But of course once you do that, you have accepted the idea that debt really is the essence of morality. You’ve accepted the masters’ language.
David Graeber, anthropology professor at Goldsmiths, University of London, interviewed by The White Review. (via socio-logic)

(Source: therecipe)

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The situation at the convergence of all these trends is something like this: the American economy, like all market economies, needs people to have children to fuel its growth, or else it has to import them from other countries. Yet in typical capitalist fashion, society has placed all of the burden of producing new laborers on individuals. Not only do you have to sell your time for wages to survive, but you also have to spend your wages raising the next generation of laborers so they can face (likely) even worse economic and ecological chaos. The goal of the system—not a dastardly plot, just the indisputable logic of capitalism—is to achieve 100 percent exploitation of its “human resources.” That means that as close as possible to 100 percent of your time and energy should be “consumed” by the system: you work your hours, then when you’re done, you spend all the rest of the time and all your paltry wages investing in the system’s next class of laborers. There’s no place in this system for becoming “you”—no place for leisure, for social relations, for intellectual development, for rest or recharging. The only way any of those things exist is through state intervention. And with our paltry minimum wages, nonexistent guaranteed vacation and nonexistent parental leave in the United States, we might as well not have a state.